Spicy Garlic Dill Pickles (Refrigerator Method)

It just wouldn’t be summer without making pickles. I still have lots of canned pickles in the pantry so I decided just to try a refrigerator pickle, in a small batch since they have to be eaten within a month. These are delicious! I have been eating them in bed at night, they are that good. This could account for the need to double the antacids lately. Andrea, if you are reading this you better pick a jar up before they are gone!

 

Refrigerate for 10 days before eating. Use within 1 month. Note: I couldn’t wait ten days and started eating the pickles from the pint jar after two days. They got better with age but were good even at two days. These are reminiscent of those famous refrigerated pickles we love from the grocery store, minus the heat. If you like just a good garlic dill, you can omit the red pepper flakes.

 

Spicy Garlic Dill Pickles (Refrigerator Method)
Ingredients
  • 5 lbs pickling cucumbers
  • 6 cups water
  • 4 cups white vinegar
  • ¾ cup white sugar
  • 9 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 5 tablespoons coarse salt
  • 3 tablespoons pickling spice
  • 2 teaspoons red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 12 sprigs fresh dill weed
Instructions
  1. DIRECTIONS:
  2. In a large bowl, combine the cucumbers, water, vinegar, sugar, and salt. Stir, and let stand at room temperature until the sugar and salt dissolve completely. Wash three or four quart canning jars, lids and rings in hot, soapy water. Use the sanitize cycle of your dishwasher or a boiling water bath sterilize the jars. NOTE: The method described here is for refrigerator pickles that MUST be stored in the fridge and NOT on a shelf, unless you are in the mood for a good case of ptomaine poisoning. Even if the lids seal when the pickles are done, they are NOT safe unless refrigerated. Consider yourself warned.
  3. Wash and rinse the cucumbers in cold water.
  4. Per groworganic.com
  5. cut a 1/16 inch slice off the blossom end of each cucumber. Find the blossom end by looking for the rough dot (instead of the smooth, indented dot) at the end of the cuke. There’s an enzyme in the blossom that can make the pickle soft and unsafe to eat. Who says so?
  6. The National Center for Home Food Preservation
  7. , that’s who.
  8. Slice the cucumbers in half or spears depending on your preference and the size of the cucumbers.
  9. Mix the pickling spice and red pepper flakes in a small bowl. Place a small amount of the spice mixture, one sprig of dill, and a garlic clove in the bottom of each quart jar. Mine made three quarts and one pint. Stuff the cucumbers into the jars. Halfway, drop in more spice, another garlic clove and a sprig of dill. Continue to fill the jars, ending with spice garlic and dill. If you have space at the top you may have to cut your cucumbers in half horizontally to fill the jar.
  10. Ladle in the liquid from the bowl into the jars to cover the cucumbers. Seal with lids. Refrigerate for 10 days before eating. Use within 1 month. Note: I couldn't wait ten days and started eating the pickles from the pint jar after two days. They got better with age but were good even at two days. These are reminiscent of those famous refrigerated pickles we love from the grocery store, minus the heat. If you like just a good garlic dill, you can omit the red pepper flakes.

 

Comments

  1. OK no fair I have to work all week. Save me some I will be there next weekend. You have to save me some no loving mother could torment her only daughter with pickles and then not save her some.

We Would Love To Hear From You!

*

Rate this recipe:  


Hit Counter provided by laptop reviews